Violence against Prisoners of War in the First World War: Britain, France and Germany, 1914-1920 (Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare)

Violence against Prisoners of War in the First World War: Britain, France and Germany, 1914-1920 (Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare)

Heather Jones


during this groundbreaking new research, Heather Jones offers the 1st in-depth and comparative exam of violence opposed to First international warfare prisoners. She exhibits how the struggle radicalised captivity therapy in Britain, France and Germany, dramatically undermined overseas legislation maintaining prisoners of struggle and resulted in new types of pressured prisoner labour and reprisals, which fuelled wartime propaganda that used to be frequently in accordance with actual prisoner testimony. This booklet unearths how, in the course of the clash, expanding numbers of captives weren't despatched to domestic entrance camps yet retained in western entrance operating devices to labour without delay for the British, French and German armies - within the German case, by way of 1918, prisoners operating for the German military persevered common malnutrition and relentless beatings. Dr Jones examines the importance of those new, violent tendencies and their later legacy, arguing that the good struggle marked a key turning-point within the 20th century evolution of the criminal camp.

Show sample text content

Download sample