The Atheist's Bible: The Most Dangerous Book That Never Existed

The Atheist's Bible: The Most Dangerous Book That Never Existed

Georges Minois


Like loads of sturdy tales, this one starts with a rumor: in 1239, Pope Gregory IX accused Frederick II, the Holy Roman Emperor, of heresy. with no disclosing proof of any sort, Gregory introduced that Frederick had written a supremely blasphemous book—De tribus impostoribus, or the Treatise of the 3 Impostors—in which Frederick denounced Moses, Jesus, and Muhammad as impostors. after all, Frederick denied the cost, and over the next centuries the tale performed out throughout Europe, with libertines, freethinkers, and different “strong minds” looking a duplicate of the scandalous textual content. The fascination continued till eventually, within the eighteenth century, a person introduced the purported paintings into genuine existence—in no longer one yet models, Latin and French.
 
Although historians have debated the origins and affects of this nonexistent e-book, there has now not been a finished biography of the Treatise of the 3 Impostors. In The Atheist’s Bible, the eminent historian Georges Minois tracks the process the ebook from its origins in 1239 to its so much salient episodes within the 17th and eighteenth centuries, introducing readers to the colourful participants passionate about owning the mythical work—and the both obsessive ardour of these who desired to punish those who sought it. Minois’s compelling account sheds much-needed gentle at the strength of atheism, the specter of blasphemy, and the endurance of unfastened idea in the course of a time whilst the outspoken risked being burned on the stake.          

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