Sojourning for Freedom: Black Women, American Communism, and the Making of Black Left Feminism

Sojourning for Freedom: Black Women, American Communism, and the Making of Black Left Feminism

Erik S. McDuffie


Sojourning for Freedom portrays pioneering black ladies activists from the early 20th century during the Nineteen Seventies, targeting their participation within the U.S. Communist occasion (CPUSA) among 1919 and 1956. Erik S. McDuffie considers how girls from diversified locales and backgrounds turned radicalized, joined the CPUSA, and encouraged a pathbreaking politics devoted to black liberation, women’s rights, decolonization, fiscal justice, peace, and foreign unity. McDuffie explores the lives of black left feminists, together with the bohemian international traveller Louise Thompson Patterson, who wrote concerning the “triple exploitation” of race, gender, and sophistication; Esther Cooper Jackson, an Alabama-based civil rights activist who chronicled the studies of black lady family staff; and Claudia Jones, the Trinidad-born activist who emerged as one of many Communist Party’s major theorists of black women’s exploitation. Drawing on greater than 40 oral histories accrued from veteran black ladies radicals and their relatives, McDuffie examines how those girls negotiated race, gender, classification, sexuality, and politics in the CPUSA. In Sojourning for Freedom, he depicts a neighborhood of radical black girls activist intellectuals who helped to put the root for a transnational smooth black feminism.

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