Self-Consciousness and the Critique of the Subject: Hegel, Heidegger, and the Poststructuralists

Self-Consciousness and the Critique of the Subject: Hegel, Heidegger, and the Poststructuralists


Poststructuralists carry Hegel liable for giving upward thrust to a lot of sleek philosophy's complicated concepts―the authority of cause, self-consciousness, the figuring out topic. but, in keeping with Simon Lumsden, this animosity is rooted in a basic false impression of Hegel's idea, and resolving this stress can't simply heal the rift among poststructuralism and German idealism but additionally element those traditions in intriguing new instructions.

Revisiting the philosopher's key texts, Lumsden calls consciousness to Hegel's reformulation of liberal and Cartesian conceptions of subjectivity, picking out a severe even though unrecognized continuity among poststructuralism and German idealism. Poststructuralism cast its id against idealist subjectivity; notwithstanding, Lumsden argues this version isn't really present in Hegel's texts yet in an uncritical recognition of Heidegger's characterization of Hegel and Fichte as "metaphysicians of subjectivity." Recasting Hegel as either post-Kantian and postmetaphysical, Lumsden sheds new gentle in this advanced thinker whereas revealing the astonishing affinities among supposedly antithetical modes of thought.

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