Mirages and Mad Beliefs: Proust the Skeptic

Mirages and Mad Beliefs: Proust the Skeptic

Christopher Prendergast


Marcel Proust used to be lengthy the article of a cult during which the most aspect of analyzing his nice novel In seek of misplaced Time used to be to discover, with its narrator, a redemptive epiphany in a pastry and a cup of lime-blossom tea. We now stay in much less convinced instances, in ways in which position nice pressure at the assumptions and ideology that made these past readings attainable. This has ended in a brand new demeanour of analyzing Proust, opposed to the grain. In Mirages and Mad Beliefs, Christopher Prendergast argues the case another way, with the grain, at the foundation that Proust himself used to be prey to self-doubt and located quite a few, if oblique, methods of letting us comprehend. Prendergast strains intimately the destinations and varieties of a quietly nondogmatic but insistently skeptical voice that questions the redemptive aesthetic the unconventional is so frequently taken to rejoice, bringing the reader to wonder if that aesthetic is yet one other example of the mirage or the mad trust that, in different guises, figures prominently in In seek of misplaced Time. In tracing the modalities of this self-pressuring voice, Prendergast levels everywhere, throughout a multiplicity of principles, subject matters, resources, and stylistic registers in Proust's literary concept and writing perform, attentive at each aspect to inflections of element, in a sustained account of Proust the skeptic for the modern reader.

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