Mind and Hand: The Birth of MIT (MIT Press)

Mind and Hand: The Birth of MIT (MIT Press)


The motto at the seal of the Massachusetts Institute of know-how, "Mens et Manus" -- "mind and hand" -- indications the Institute's commitment to what MIT founder William Barton Rogers referred to as "the so much earnest cooperation of clever tradition with commercial pursuits." Mind and Hand lines the information approximately technological know-how and schooling that experience formed MIT and outlined its venture -- from the recent technology of the Enlightenment period and the beliefs of consultant democracy spurred through the economic Revolution to new theories at the nature and function of upper schooling in nineteenth-century the United States. MIT emerged in mid-century as an test in medical and technical schooling, with its origins within the stress among those outdated and new ideas.Mind and Hand was once undertaken by means of Julius Stratton after his retirement from the presidency of MIT and persisted by way of Loretta Mannix after his loss of life; Philip N. Alexander, of the MIT software in Writing and Humanistic experiences, stepped in to accomplish the venture. The mixed efforts of those 3 authors have given us what Julius Stratton expected -- "a coherent account of the stream of principles" from which MIT emerged.

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