Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil: A Savannah Story

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil: A Savannah Story

John Berendt


pictures rang out in Savannah's grandest mansion within the misty,early morning hours of might 2, 1981.  Was it homicide or self-defense?  For approximately a decade, the taking pictures and its aftermath reverberated all through this hauntingly attractive urban of moss-hung oaks and shaded squares.  John Berendt's sharply saw, suspenseful, and witty narrative reads like a completely engrossing novel, and but it's a paintings of nonfiction.  Berendt skillfully interweaves a highly enjoyable first-person account of lifestyles during this remoted remnant of the outdated South with the unpredictable twists and turns of a landmark homicide case.

It is a spellbinding tale peopled by way of a gallery of outstanding characters: the well-bred society women of the Married Woman's Card membership; the turbulent younger redneck gigolo; the hapless recluse who owns a bottle of poison so robust it might kill each guy, lady, and baby in Savannah; the getting older and profane Southern belle who's the "soul of pampered self-absorption"; the uproariously humorous black drag queen; the acerbic and boastful antiques broker; the sweet-talking, piano-playing con artist; younger blacks dancing the minuet on the black debutante ball; and Minerva, the voodoo priestess who works her magic within the graveyard at midnight.  These and different Savannahians act as a Greek refrain, with Berendt revealing the alliances, hostilities, and intrigues that thrive in a city the place we all know every body else.

nighttime within the backyard of fine and Evil is a chic and seductive interpreting experience.  Brilliantly conceived and masterfully written, this tremendously attractive portrait of a so much beguiling Southern urban has develop into a contemporary vintage.

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