Melville and the Idea of Blackness: Race and Imperialism in Nineteenth Century America (Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture)

Melville and the Idea of Blackness: Race and Imperialism in Nineteenth Century America (Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture)

Christopher Freeburg


through reading the original difficulties that "blackness" indicates in Moby-Dick, Pierre, "Benito Cereno," and "The Encantadas," Christopher Freeburg analyzes how Herman Melville grapples with the social realities of racial distinction in nineteenth-century the United States. the place Melville's critics often learn blackness as both a metaphor for the haunting energy of slavery or an allegory of ethical evil, Freeburg asserts that blackness capabilities because the web site the place Melville correlates the sociopolitical demanding situations of transatlantic slavery and U.S. colonial enlargement with philosophical issues approximately mastery. via concentrating on Melville's iconic interracial encounters, Freeburg finds the $64000 position blackness performs in Melville's portrayal of characters' laborious makes an attempt to grab their very own future, amass medical wisdom, and excellent themselves. A worthy source for students and graduate scholars in American literature, this article will additionally entice these operating in American, African American, and postcolonial reviews.

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