Into the Quagmire: Lyndon Johnson and the Escalation of the Vietnam War

Into the Quagmire: Lyndon Johnson and the Escalation of the Vietnam War

Brian VanDeMark


In November of 1964, as Lyndon Johnson celebrated his landslide victory over Barry Goldwater, the govt. of South Vietnam lay in a shambles. Ambassador Maxwell Taylor defined it as a rustic beset by way of "chronic factionalism, civilian-military suspicion and mistrust, absence of nationwide spirit and motivation, loss of team spirit within the social constitution, loss of event within the behavior of government." almost not anyone within the Johnson management believed that Saigon may defeat the communist insurgency--and but by way of July of 1965, a trifling 9 months later, they might lock the U.S. on a course towards gigantic army intervention which might finally spoil Johnson's presidency and polarize the yankee people.
Into the Quagmire offers a heavily rendered, virtually daily account of America's deepening involvement in Vietnam in the course of these the most important 9 months. Mining a wealth of lately opened fabric on the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and somewhere else, Brian VanDeMark vividly depicts the painful unfolding of a countrywide tragedy. We meet an LBJ ceaselessly frightened of a conservative backlash, which he felt might doom his nice Society, an not sure and bothered chief grappling with the undesirable burden of Vietnam; George Ball, a maverick on Vietnam, whose rigorously reasoned (and, on reflection, strikingly prescient) stand opposed to escalation used to be discounted by means of Rusk, McNamara, and Bundy; and Clark Clifford, whose last-minute attempt at a pivotal assembly at Camp David didn't dissuade Johnson from doubling the variety of floor troops in Vietnam. What comes throughout strongly during the booklet is the deep pessimism of all of the significant individuals as issues grew worse--neither LBJ, nor Bundy, nor McNamara, nor Rusk felt convinced that issues may enhance in South Vietnam, that there has been any moderate likelihood for victory, or that the South had the desire or the facility to succeed opposed to the North. And but deeper into the quagmire they went.
no matter if describing a demanding war of words among George Ball and Dean Acheson ("You goddamned previous bastards," Ball stated to Acheson, "you ring a bell in me of not anything rather a lot as a host of buzzards sitting on a fence and letting the younger males die") or corrupt politicians in Saigon, VanDeMark offers readers with the complete style of nationwide coverage within the making. extra vital, he sheds better mild on why the US turned entangled within the morass of Vietnam.

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