Günter Grass and His Critics: From The Tin Drum to Crabwalk (Studies in German Literature Linguistics and Culture)

Günter Grass and His Critics: From The Tin Drum to Crabwalk (Studies in German Literature Linguistics and Culture)

Siegfried Mews


while the Swedish Academy introduced that Günter Grass were offered the 1999 Nobel Prize for Literature, it singled out his first novel 'The Tin Drum' (1959, English translation 1963) as a seminal paintings that had signaled the postwar rebirth of German letters, auguring 'new starting after many years of linguistic and ethical destruction.' approximately fifty years after its booklet, the novel's value has been ordinarily stated: it's the uncontested favourite between Grass's works of fiction at the a part of interpreting public and critics alike, but its canonical prestige has a tendency to imprecise the decidedly combined or even opposed reactions it at first elicited. in addition to 'The Tin Drum' Grass's outstanding physique of literary paintings because the Fifties has spawned a cottage of Grass feedback, creating a trustworthy consultant in the course of the thicket of occasionally contradictory readings a distinct desideratum. Siegfried Mews fills this lacuna in Grass scholarship when it comes to a close yet succinct, descriptive in addition to analytical and evaluative evaluate of the scholarship from 1959 to 2005. Grass's politically inspired interventions in public discourse have saved him hugely noticeable, blurring the bounds among politics and aesthetics. Mews accordingly examines not just educational feedback but additionally the day-by-day and weekly press (and different information media), supplying extra perception into the reception of Grass's works.

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