God and Blackness: Race, Gender, and Identity in a Middle Class Afrocentric Church

God and Blackness: Race, Gender, and Identity in a Middle Class Afrocentric Church

Andrea C. Abrams


Blackness, as an idea, is intensely fluid: it could actually discuss with cultural and ethnic identification, socio-political prestige, a classy and embodied manner of being, a social and political awareness, or a diasporic kinship. it's used as an outline of pores and skin colour starting from the palest cream to the richest chocolate; as a marker of enslavement, marginalization, illegal activity, dust, or evil; or as an emblem of delight, good looks, splendor, energy, and intensity. although it truly is elusive and tough to outline, blackness serves as some of the most powerful and unifying domain names of identity. 
 
God and Blackness offers an ethnographic examine of blackness because it is known inside of a selected community—that of the 1st Afrikan Church, a middle-class Afrocentric congregation in Atlanta, Georgia. Drawing on approximately years of player remark and in‑depth interviews, Andrea C. Abrams examines how this group has hired Afrocentrism and Black theology as a way of negotiating the unreconciled natures of innovations and beliefs which are a part of being either black and American. in particular, Abrams examines the ways that First Afrikan’s development of group is inspired by way of shared understandings of blackness, and probes the ability wherein participants negotiate the tensions created by means of competing structures in their black identification. even supposing Afrocentrism operates because the point of interest of this dialogue, the publication examines questions of political id, non secular expression and gender dynamics during the lens of a distinct black church.  

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