Ender's Game and Philosophy: Genocide Is Child's Play (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Ender's Game and Philosophy: Genocide Is Child's Play (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

D. E. Wittkower, Lucinda Rush


Ender’s Game, Orson Scott Card’s award-winning 1985 novel, has been came across and rediscovered through generations of technological know-how fiction enthusiasts, even being followed as interpreting by means of the U.S. Marine Corps. Ender's video game and its sequels discover wealthy subject matters — the violence and cruelty of kids, the position of empathy in warfare, and the stability of person dignity and the social solid — with compelling parts of a coming-of-age tale.

Ender’s video game and Philosophy brings jointly over 30 philosophers to interact in wide-ranging dialogue on concerns akin to: the justifiability of pre-emptive moves; how Ender’s disconnected and dispassionate violence is reflected in today’s drone conflict; no matter if the top of saving the species can justify the main brutal potential; the justifiability of lies and deception in wartime, and the way army faculties produce education in advantage.

The authors of Ender’s video game and Philosophy problem readers to confront the demanding situations that Ender’s video game offers, bringing new insights to the belief of a simply warfare, the virtues of the soldier, the character of early life, and the intense paintings of enjoying games.(less)

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