Ecstasy, Catastrophe: Heidegger from Being and Time to the Black Notebooks (SUNY series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy)

Ecstasy, Catastrophe: Heidegger from Being and Time to the Black Notebooks (SUNY series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy)


Lectures on ecstatic temporality and on Heidegger’s political legacy.

In Ecstasy, Catastrophe, David Farrell Krell offers perception into components of Heidegger’s suggestion: his research of ecstatic temporality in Being and Time (1927)and his “political” feedback within the lately released Black Notebooks (1931–1941). the 1st a part of Krell’s e-book makes a speciality of Heidegger’s interpretation of time, which Krell takes to be considered one of Heidegger’s maximum philosophical achievements. as well as delivering special observation on ecstatic temporality, Krell considers Derrida’s research of ekstasis in his first seminar on Heidegger, taught in Paris in 1964–1965. Krell additionally relates ecstatic temporality to the paintings of different philosophers, together with Aristotle, Augustine, Kant, Schelling, Hölderlin, and Merleau-Ponty; he then analyzes Dasein as youngster and baby, referring to ecstatic temporality to the “mirror degree” idea of Jacques Lacan.

the second one a part of the e-book turns to Heidegger’s Black Notebooks, that have acquired a good deal of serious awareness within the press and in philosophical circles. infamous for his or her pejorative references to Jews and Jewish tradition, the Notebooks express a degree of polemic all through that Krell takes to be catastrophic in and for Heidegger’s suggestion. Heidegger’s legacy consequently looks break up among the easiest and the worst of thinking—somewhere among ecstasy and catastrophe.

in keeping with the 2014 Brauer Lectures in German stories at Brown collage, the e-book communicates the end result of Krell’s a long time of labor on Heidegger in an interesting and obtainable style.

“…[the e-book] unearths Krell as a beneficiant and gracious philosopher and teacher.” — Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

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