Covert Capital: Landscapes of Denial and the Making of U.S. Empire in the Suburbs of Northern Virginia

Covert Capital: Landscapes of Denial and the Making of U.S. Empire in the Suburbs of Northern Virginia

Andrew Friedman


The capital of the U.S. Empire after global battle II used to be no longer a urban. It used to be an American suburb. during this leading edge and well timed heritage, Andrew Friedman chronicles how the CIA and different nationwide protection associations created a U.S. imperial domestic entrance within the suburbs of Northern Virginia. during this covert capital, the suburban panorama supplied a canopy for the workings of U.S. imperial energy, which formed family suburban existence. The Pentagon and the CIA equipped of the most important place of work structures within the state there in the course of and after the battle that anchored a brand new imperial tradition and social world.

As the U.S. improved its strength out of the country via constructing roads, embassies, and villages, its topics additionally arrived within the covert capital as genuine property brokers, owners, developers, and landscapers who developed areas and residing monuments that either nurtured and critiqued postwar U.S. international coverage. Tracing the relationships between American brokers and the migrants from Vietnam, El Salvador, Iran, and in other places who settled within the southwestern suburbs of D.C., Friedman tells the tale of a spot that recasts rules approximately U.S. immigration, citizenship, nationalism, worldwide interconnection, and moral accountability from the post-WW2 interval to the current. commencing a brand new window onto the intertwined historical past of the yankee suburbs and U.S. overseas coverage, Covert Capital also will supply readers a vast interdisciplinary and sometimes extraordinary figuring out of the way U.S. family and international histories intersect in lots of contexts and at many scales.

American Crossroads, 37

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