A Short History of Nuclear Folly

A Short History of Nuclear Folly

Rudolph Herzog


In the spirit of Dr. Strangelove and The Atomic Café, a blackly sardonic people’s background of atomic mistakes and near-misses revealing the hushed-up and forgotten episodes during which the good powers gambled with catastrophe

Rudolph Herzog, the acclaimed writer of Dead Funny, provides a devastating account of history’s so much irresponsible makes use of of nuclear expertise. From the rarely-discussed nightmare of “Broken Arrows” (40 nuclear guns misplaced throughout the chilly battle) to “Operation Plowshare” (a thought to exploit nuclear bombs for giant engineering tasks, akin to a the development of a moment Panama Canal utilizing three hundred H-Bombs), Herzog focuses in on long-forgotten nuclear initiatives that almost resulted in disaster.

In an unheard of people’s heritage, Herzog digs deep into data, interviews nuclear scientists, and collects dozens of infrequent pictures. He explores the “accidental” drop of a Nagasaki-type bomb on a educate conductor’s domestic, the implanting of plutonium into sufferers’ hearts, and the discovery of untamed tactical nukes, together with guns designed to kill enemy astronauts.

Told in a riveting narrative voice, Herzog—the son of filmmaker Werner Herzog—also attracts on adolescence stories of the ultimate period of the chilly battle in Germany, the rustic as soon as noticeable because the nuclear battleground for NATO and the Warsaw Pact international locations, and discusses facts that Nazi scientists knew how one can make atomic weaponry . . . and selected no longer to.

From the Hardcover edition.

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